Turbomachinery Inlet Gas Filtration

Industrial gases including nitrogen, hydrogen, and hydrocarbons are often compressed or passed through turbomachinery. Liquid and solid contamination in the inlet gas can corrode, erode, and foul the internal components of such units. Corrosion can be minimized by choosing more resistant alloys and proper coatings. Erosion is usually caused by solid particles with diameters larger than 5µm. Filtration would virtually eliminate this problem.
The least understood problem associated with contaminants is fouling. Small solid and liquid aerosols adhere to the surface of turbomachine blading. This gradual deposition causes flow blockage at the throats of vane and blade passages. The reduction in gas flow through turbine and compressor nozzles results in a loss of gas output. Fouling can normally be reserved before cleaning, but it often requires costly downtime.

 

Turbomachinery Inlet Gas Filtration 

 


A typical blade’s lifetime for gas turbines, operating with clean fuels, is greater than 45,000 hours and a minimum of 25,000 hours between major overhauls. This could be achieved by removing aerosols of 0.3µm and larger from inlet gas.