Potable Water Systems

In most circumstances, well-controlled, hygienic water is delivered from water plants to cities.  However within buildings, water can stagnate and its temperature increase.  It passes through complex internal distribution systems consisting of narrow pipes with possibly corroded inner surfaces and dead ends.  This environment can provide optimal conditions for the formation of biofilm from which bacteria and other microorganisms may be continuously released into the water.

 

Pall Medical designs, manufactures and supplies specialized filtration from the point of building entry through to the point of use at faucets, showers and other water sources.  This portfolio assures the highest filtration efficiency for waterborne bacteria, endotoxin, protozoa, fungi and particles in in-premise water networks and supports water management programs.

Burn Wound Cleansing & Best Practices to Avoid Infection

Burn wound cleansing is an essential part of wound management and supports wound healing procedures. However, burn wound cleansing can also lead to colonization or infection if not performed correctly. Burn wounds need to be rinsed with water, Ringer’s solution or NaCl solution to remove particles and necrotic tissue. The solutions used for burn wound cleansing need to be sterile or sterilizing grade filtrated, so that no colonization or infection by waterborne pathogens can be caused.

This timely webinar will explore and discuss best practices for burn wound cleansing to avoid infections, especially from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

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Water for Patient Care - USA

In water distribution systems biofilm can develop within a few days even if the water meets drinking water criteria. Biofilm protects the microorganisms within from chemical agents and thermal disinfection procedures, and is extremely difficult to completely eradicate once established. Biofilms contain a large variety of waterborne microorganisms including protozoa (e.g. Acanthamoeba), fungi (e.g. Aspergillus spp., Fusarium spp.) and a number of human pathogenic bacteria.
In water distribution systems biofilm can develop within a few days even if the water meets drinking water criteria. Biofilm protects the microorganisms within from chemical agents and thermal disinfection procedures, and is extremely difficult to completely eradicate once established. Biofilms contain a large variety of waterborne microorganisms including protozoa (e.g. Acanthamoeba), fungi (e.g. Aspergillus spp., Fusarium spp.) and a number of human pathogenic bacteria.
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Water for Patient Care - International

In water distribution systems biofilm can develop within a few days even if the water meets drinking water criteria. Biofilm protects the microorganisms within from chemical agents and thermal disinfection procedures, and is extremely difficult to completely eradicate once established. Biofilms contain a large variety of waterborne microorganisms including protozoa (e.g. Acanthamoeba), fungi (e.g. Aspergillus spp., Fusarium spp.) and a number of human pathogenic bacteria.
In water distribution systems biofilm can develop within a few days even if the water meets drinking water criteria. Biofilm protects the microorganisms within from chemical agents and thermal disinfection procedures, and is extremely difficult to completely eradicate once established. Biofilms contain a large variety of waterborne microorganisms including protozoa (e.g. Acanthamoeba), fungi (e.g. Aspergillus spp., Fusarium spp.) and a number of human pathogenic bacteria.
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Water for Public & Residential Use

In water distribution systems biofilm can develop within a few days even if the water meets drinking water criteria. Biofilm protects the microorganisms within from chemical agents and thermal disinfection procedures, and is extremely difficult to completely eradicate once established. Biofilms contain a large variety of waterborne microorganisms including protozoa (e.g. Acanthamoeba), fungi (e.g. Aspergillus spp., Fusarium spp.) and a number of human pathogenic bacteria.
In water distribution systems biofilm can develop within a few days even if the water meets drinking water criteria. Biofilm protects the microorganisms within from chemical agents and thermal disinfection procedures, and is extremely difficult to completely eradicate once established. Biofilms contain a large variety of waterborne microorganisms including protozoa (e.g. Acanthamoeba), fungi (e.g. Aspergillus spp., Fusarium spp.) and a number of human pathogenic bacteria.
Read more